Tag Archives: Happiness

Don’t Put Off the Good Things to Tomorrow

24 Jul

“You’re the first person to say ‘Don’t put off till tomorrow what you can do today’, yet you always put off doing good things for yourself“, said my partner to me recently. “You don’t put off doing the dishes, or tidying up, or checking e-mails, but you never prioritise things such as yoga or reading which make you happy.”

He was so right and his words were a revelation to me. It had never crossed my mind that I shouldn’t put off the good things, too – I thought this motto only applied for chores and tasks.

I always knew that by not putting off our chores and tasks we have a better-organised life, we save time, we reduce stress. I never thought about the fact that by not putting off activities we enjoy, we …. don’t put off enjoying ourselves!

Let’s make the most of our time and prioritise at least one of our loved activities today. Let’s not put off being happy.

Today I will: make an iced coffee, read a book, ride a bike. And you?

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A Few Seconds of Happiness

8 Jul

It was a rare moment: wanting to say “I’m happy” out loud.

It lasted for just a few seconds with the perfect combination of circumstances..

ice cubes clinking in a cool glass,
soft skirt brushing against my not-so-pale thighs,
hair with that magical smell of sun and salt,
the earth damp with recent hose-pipe watering,
swallows circling overhead,
leaves nodding to the breeze,
Saturday evening silence.

What has made you say “I’m happy” recently?

Happiness is not a Destination

19 Sep

What makes us happy?

Psychologist Sonja Lyubomirsky conducted an experiment on “The How of Happiness” and the results are truly fascinating.

According to Lyubomirsky, 50% of our happiness comes from our genes.

Only 10% of our happiness is made up of – (get prepared to be blown away) – external factors, such as money, the weather, our job, the car we drive, the clothes we wear…

And the remaining 40% of our happiness is determined by…..our attitude and our behaviour in the face of each situation in our lives.

Isn’t t funny, how we all think that a job, a house, a car, a dress, or a party will change our lives from miserable to joyful? Isn’t it strange, how we believe that a salary, a title, a brand will transform our lives from Hell to Heaven?

The “things” we believe so important for our happiness actually only make up a very small percentage of it.

The rest comes from the inside – how we choose to feel, how we choose to react, how we choose to think.

We cannot always change the circumstances in our life, but what Lyubomirsky has proved is that it is enough to change our attitude to these circumstances in order to transform our lives for the better.

As Louise Hay says:

“When we cannot change a situation, we must begin to change the way we view it.”

120 Days of Doing What I Love

8 Sep

This is the 120th day of the 120-Day “Do What You Love” Challenge, in which I have written (almost) every day for the past four months.

I feel as if I should be celebrating or congratulating myself, but completing the Challenge has not aroused any extreme emotions in me. I guess this is for the simple reason that writing every day has come very naturally to me.

I had many fears when I started the Challenge:

I was scared that, were I to ‘force’ myself to do my loved activity every day, I would actually cease to love it.

I was also scared that I wouldn’t have the will-power to make time for writing.

Like all creative people, I was scared of discovering that I am rubbish at what I do.

And, I was scared of being so scared of all of these things, that my fear would block me from writing.

Now, four months later, I laugh at these fears and thank God that I decided to overcome them.

I never “forced” myself to write every day – I encouraged myself to do it and really enjoyed every moment that I put aside for writing. I never “forced” myself to write anything in particular, either. Every time I sat down to write, I would let my fantasy, my ideas and my emotions express themselves as they wished. Seeing as I always wrote what I enjoyed, I always enjoyed writing it!

I realised that I didn’t necessarily need to put aside an hour for writing every day – even fifteen minutes is enough. In fifteen minutes, I can write a poem, my impressions of the day and even a very short story!

Seeing as I was writing for myself and using each day as an experiment, I never judged my writing to be good or bad. Every new creation was a surprise and a progress.

Very soon into the Challenge, I realised that I enjoy writing so much that my fears fall away as my joy increases.

writing

Pollyanna Darling, founder of the 120-day “Do What You Love Challenge”, said that we often feel guilty about doing what we love, because doing what we love has no goal apart from enjoying ourselves and feeling happy. This was my case, but paradoxically, after four months of doing what I love every day, it is precisely because of this enjoyment and happiness that I continue to write!

I would like to thank Pollyanna Darling for the wonderful idea of the 120 Day “Do What You Love” Challenge. I thank her for encouraging her readers to take part. I thank her for the happiness that writing every day has brought into my life. I thank her for the amazing writing habit that I have now acquired. I thank her for the release of my fears. And, most importantly, I thank her for having taken the step to do what she loves and for having showed us the way.

I am sure that what started as a challenge will continue as a way of life. I wish for others to give the 120-Day “Do What You Love” Challenge a go to discover for themselves.

What you love is what you’re gifted at. To be completely happy, to live a completely fulfilled life, you have to do what you love.
  ~Barbara Sher 

Tattoo drawing on palms hands

Related posts:

120-Day “Do What You Love” Challenge

Do What You Love – One Month In

60 Days of Doing What I Love

Three Months of Doing What I Love

The 117th Day

Never Grow Old

28 May

She raced around the house in roller-blades.

She sang out loud in the street.

She picked icing off the cake the whole way home.

She read her book sprawled across a trampoline.

She danced to Madonna in her bedroom, when everyone had gone to sleep.

She ate half a pack of crackers and the last gherkin.

She helped herself to a handful of cherries at the market “to check if they were ripe”.

She drew a smile on her thigh, making a pair of eyes out of her two black bruises.

She was thirteen, and she was the best example of freedom that I had seen in my life.