Tag Archives: Path

The Universe’s Advice

6 Jun

Walk gently but strongly,
Like you’d wade through the sea.
Listen to your breathing
And spare a thought for Me.

Walk gently but strongly,
And let the people pass,
You are not the only one
Grazing on this grass.

Walk gently but firmly,
You know the path to take.
Don’t let them distract you,
Live for your Truth’s sake.

Walk gently but surely,
The way a Love would walk;
You are the flower,
The root, the leaf, the stalk.

Walk gently but wisely,
Believe in every move,
And it shall be worth it,
Your journey shall be smooth.

 © Love Out Loud

Thank You 2011

17 Jan

At the end of 2011, many people wrote and talked about the wonderful things that the past year had brought them. Today, I would like to do the same.

Thank You 2011 for:

Making one of my dreams come true.

Introducing me to a simpler way of life.

Clearing out and getting rid of many unnecessary elements in my life (clothes, possessions, people, ideas, habits).

Teaching me to listen to myself, rather than seeking other people’s opinions.

Giving me the courage to be more open, more honest and more natural.

Showing me that the life we dream of is a) never the way it is in our dreams, b) not necessarily the best life for us.

Showing me that we are the creators of our own happiness.

Making me lost, confused, doubtful and frustrated – I learnt a lot about myself through these emotions.

Helping me take a small, yet huge, step to making peace with my past and healing wounded relationships.

Showing me that we have to make the most of what we have, even if it’s not what we wanted to have.

Making me realise that what I thought was of colossal importance actually means very little in the grand scheme of things.

Showing me that love is the only thing that’s real.

Photo Friday – Walking is Discovery

13 Jan

All walking is discovery. On foot we take the time to see things whole
~ Hal Borland

 

Counting the Blessings, Not the Events in My Life

15 May

I had heard that time flies, but no-one had told me that it soars. The past year has gone by with the blink of an eye. For me, it has had little form and even less structure. What have I done during the past twelve months? What has happened in the last 365 days? Looking back, the past year looks like a stretch of time marked by uncertainty, emptiness and waiting. Things have moved at a slower pace than ever before, and there are few events that have been caught on camera or written into a diary. However, when I think about the past year, I realise for the first time that it is not the quantity of memorable events that matters so much as their quality. This year has brought few notable events, but they have had a crucial role in the direction of my life’s path.

1) I graduated from university.

2) I went on a life-changing trip to India.

3) I completed a novel-writing course, which made me realise that, despite my fears, that I am capable.

4) I was offered my first ‘real’ job in a field that I love.

5) I moved to a different country.

6) I moved in with my boyfriend.

However, when I look back at the past year, these events feature only as a backdrop to that which happened on centre stage. In fact, it is my spiritual experiences and changes that played the main role during this period of time.

1) I got rid of 50% of my material possessions. In my new home, I live only with the things that I use regularly.

2) I deleted my social networking accounts. If they’re my real friends, I should be able to call them to find out about their lives. If I feel uncomfortable about picking up the phone to speak to them, I don’t need to be filling my mind with their lives. Seven months without Facebook, and I feel calmer, more confident and I know who my true friends are.

3) I took a risk. When I started job-hunting last autumn, I knew that I had two choices: I could either persevere and look for jobs in the field that I love –writing – or I could take the easier option of going into a better paid, more stable and more ‘prestigious’ career. Parents considered The City or the EU as a good destination for me, but I knew that if I didn’t take the chance to try my luck in writing, I would never again have the opportunity to do so. Three months later, I was offered a job as an online content editor.

4) I made a dream come true. Ever since I was a little girl, I dreamed of working in a cute little bookshop, where I would be able to pass on my love for literature to others. In the autumn, I was hired for a week-end shift at a new independent bookshop in my area. I only worked there for four months, but the experience was unforgettable. I was blessed with kind, knowledgeable and good-humoured colleagues, with friendly clients and with a brilliant stock of books to enjoy.

5) I chose love over fear.  What if I don’t like it? What if it doesn’t work out? What if he changes his mind? What if we get bored? A million doubts filling my mind before moving to a new country and moving in with my boyfriend. Four months after my move, this new life feels like second nature.

6) I was honest with myself. Young women my age are going to parties, filling their days with countless activities, following fashion, spending, seducing, networking…I tried, but never found fulfilment in any of these activities. I finally admitted to myself that I would prefer to spend Friday night watching the sunset from a hill, spend the afternoon riding a bike, spend evenings doing yoga, spend the week-ends doing photography, and spend my money on dance class, art exhibitions or fresh local food from the market. By being honest with myself, I have found a more natural way of life.

This year, I may not have had many events to talk about, but I have had many ideas and feelings to share. I think I am finally starting to learn how to count the blessings, and not the events in my life…

Live the Questions

5 May

Teenagers are known to feel lost and confused, unsure about their path in life. Yet the incertitude and perplexity of adult life is less frequently mentioned as a ‘natural’ psychological phenomenon.  For me, it is the dissolution of a fixed and compulsory structure to follow, after years of ‘being told what to do’, that has often led me to feel utterly disorientated.

As a child or an adolescent, your life is guided by the school system. Each year is separate from the other, each year has its goal, and each year is neatly divided into terms with holidays in between. You know exactly how to plan your time, your week, your month and your year within these structures. You also know that after hard work (exam preparation) there will be a reward (long holidays). And you know where you will be the following autumn and what you can expect of the following year. You know that school has a purpose: it will either get you into university, or it will get you a job.

In ‘grown-up’ life there is no set structure, there are no set holidays, there are no set guidelines, no mentors, no breaks ‘between years’, no rewards for working hard (promotions and bonuses are not guaranteed each year), and, sadly, in the majority of cases, no purpose apart from earning money.

School life is like a road trip, where adults drive you from city to city. You sit in the back seat, enjoying the ride. You are told the distance between each city, so you know when there will be a good view, when you can doze off, and when you have to get out to explore the outside world actively.

In grown-up life you are the driver, having barely got your license. You have no idea how long it will take or how far away it is to the next town. You have no map and no GPS to give you directions. You have to decide independently the places to drive through and those to stop at and explore, without a guide to tell you which sites are worth seeing. And amongst all of the hitchhikers that desire to share the journey with you, how to tell which ones are worth taking along on the ride, and which ones it’s best to leave on the side of the road?

The best perspective I have read on dealing with life’s uncertainties is that of the twentieth-century German poet Rainer Maria Rilke…

I want to ask you, as clearly as I can, to bear with patience all that is unresolved in your heart, and try to love the questions themselves, as if they were rooms yet to enter or books written in a foreign language. Don’t dig for answers that can’t be given you yet: you live them now. For everything must be lived. Live the questions now, perhaps then, someday, you will gradually, without noticing, live into the answer.

Rainer Maria Rilke
Worpswede, July 16, 1903
Letters to a Young Poet