Tag Archives: Purpose

Living Your Passionate Life Purpose

4 Jun

Today is the fourth day of the Hay House World Summit: a free ten-day event which broadcasts a dozen interviews a day with inspirational writers and speakers such as Louise L. Hay, Marianne Williamson, Don Miguel Ruiz, Doreen Virtue, Neale Donald Walsch and Deepak Chopra.

Alan Cohen

Yesterday, I listened to an interview with Alan Cohen, who talked about “Living Your Passionate Life Purpose”. Alan Cohen brought up some fascinating ideas about how to find your authentic voice, how to discern between your ego’s and your soul’s voice, how to overcome challenges whilst pursuing your dreams, and how to follow the signs that God sends you.

I would like to share with you some of my favourite elements from this interview. (“I” refers to me in the text below).

On finding our calling in life.

How do we know when something is our calling? When we can’t not do it.

Even if we reject all signs that tell us to do it, the signs continue showing up, they are offered and reoffered.

I can’t not write. For one, my day feels unfulfilling if I do not write. Secondly, I have been receiving signs over and over again that this is what I should be doing. I often brush these signs aside, saying “It’s just coincidence”, but they just keep coming back.

On meeting obstacles along the way.

Overcoming obstacles

If it is our dream or our calling to do something, it does not mean that it will be easy to achieve.

If it is my calling to write a book, I will nevertheless face challenges along the way.

Just because God wants you to do it, does not mean he will hand it over on a plate to you – you have to work for it!

“When something very big is trying to be born, the labour is hard and the obstacles are many” (Joan Borysenko quoting a canoe-carver she once met).

On listening to signs.

I am often in doubt when making decisions – I am rarely ever sure whether I should pick A or B, got left or right, stay or go.

I ask for signs but I haven’t been very good at listening to them. Why? Because I keep asking for signs while at the same time ignoring all the signs I don’t want to see.

If it’s not the sign I hope for, I ignore it. Or I don’t even notice it.

If we truly want guidance, we must be willing that ‘it could go either way’. God could point us to A or B, he could suggest us to go left or right, he could encourage us to stay or go.

We mustn’t be attached to one result when asking for signs – we need to accept letting go of one option, even if it is the option that we think we would prefer.

Quotes for thought.

On being persistent: “If anything can stop you – let it” ~ Ernest Hemingway

Spirit does not want us to worship genius, Spirit wants us to express genius: “When I forget who I am, I serve You; when I remember who I am, I am You.” ~ Hanuman in the Ramayana

“Everything always works out in the end, and if it hasn’t worked out yet, it’s not the end” ~ The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel

Live the Questions

5 May

Teenagers are known to feel lost and confused, unsure about their path in life. Yet the incertitude and perplexity of adult life is less frequently mentioned as a ‘natural’ psychological phenomenon.  For me, it is the dissolution of a fixed and compulsory structure to follow, after years of ‘being told what to do’, that has often led me to feel utterly disorientated.

As a child or an adolescent, your life is guided by the school system. Each year is separate from the other, each year has its goal, and each year is neatly divided into terms with holidays in between. You know exactly how to plan your time, your week, your month and your year within these structures. You also know that after hard work (exam preparation) there will be a reward (long holidays). And you know where you will be the following autumn and what you can expect of the following year. You know that school has a purpose: it will either get you into university, or it will get you a job.

In ‘grown-up’ life there is no set structure, there are no set holidays, there are no set guidelines, no mentors, no breaks ‘between years’, no rewards for working hard (promotions and bonuses are not guaranteed each year), and, sadly, in the majority of cases, no purpose apart from earning money.

School life is like a road trip, where adults drive you from city to city. You sit in the back seat, enjoying the ride. You are told the distance between each city, so you know when there will be a good view, when you can doze off, and when you have to get out to explore the outside world actively.

In grown-up life you are the driver, having barely got your license. You have no idea how long it will take or how far away it is to the next town. You have no map and no GPS to give you directions. You have to decide independently the places to drive through and those to stop at and explore, without a guide to tell you which sites are worth seeing. And amongst all of the hitchhikers that desire to share the journey with you, how to tell which ones are worth taking along on the ride, and which ones it’s best to leave on the side of the road?

The best perspective I have read on dealing with life’s uncertainties is that of the twentieth-century German poet Rainer Maria Rilke…

I want to ask you, as clearly as I can, to bear with patience all that is unresolved in your heart, and try to love the questions themselves, as if they were rooms yet to enter or books written in a foreign language. Don’t dig for answers that can’t be given you yet: you live them now. For everything must be lived. Live the questions now, perhaps then, someday, you will gradually, without noticing, live into the answer.

Rainer Maria Rilke
Worpswede, July 16, 1903
Letters to a Young Poet